Vaccines and the fight against antimicrobial resistance 1

Published on July 28, 2021   39 min

Other Talks in the Series: Periodic Reports: Advances in Clinical Interventions and Research Platforms

0:00
Hello. My name's Dr. Annaliesa Anderson and I'm the Chief Scientific Officer for bacterial vaccines at Pfizer. My disclosure is that I work for Pfizer and as such, I'm paid by Pfizer. Today I'm going to talk about the importance of vaccines in reducing antibiotic exposure and preventing antimicrobial resistance.
0:20
I'll be conducting this lecture in two parts. The first part, we'll introduce what antimicrobial resistance is and discuss its emergence and spread. I'll explain how vaccines differ from antibiotics in their mechanism of action and I'll also give some examples of licensed vaccines that have had a documented and proven ability to fight antimicrobial resistance. In my second part of this lecture, I will be giving some examples where vaccines don't currently assist against specific pathogens that of concern for antimicrobial resistance and the work that is being done to develop vaccines that can protect against these diseases. I'll be giving an overview of the global mobilization actions by different agencies to implement the use of vaccines to prevent antimicrobial resistance. I'll discuss barriers to maximizing licensed vaccines in the fight against AMR and talk about efforts that are being made towards better utilization of vaccines against AMR.
1:32
In this first section, I'll talk about the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance.
1:39
Antimicrobial resistance is a natural evolutionary process. It occurs when pathogens such as bacteria change and find ways to resist the effect of the drugs that are used to treat them, in this case, antibiotics. The pathogens can survive, grow, and spread their resistance to other bacteria and this process of adaptation leads to antimicrobial resistance.
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Vaccines and the fight against antimicrobial resistance 1

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