Human genetic variation and the genotype-phenotype problem 1

Published on July 30, 2015   33 min

Other Talks in the Series: Topical Talks

0:00
Hello, my name is Gholson Lyon, and I'm on faculty at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory as well as working at the Utah Foundation for Biomedical Research. And the topic of my lecture today is on human genetic variation and genotype-phenotype problem.
0:18
This is an illustration of the earth, and on the right side is an illustration of a bacterial petri dish.
0:27
The earth is 4.5 billion years old. And in the eons of time, there are dinosaurs that basically went extinct 65 million years ago. And you can look at dinosaur fossils at the Utah Dinosaur National Monument as illustrated in this illustration. And if you want to be convinced that dinosaurs existed, you can look yourself at them in the rocks before they were excavated. And the only reason I'm telling you this in the context of human genetics is basically just to illustrate to you that there is an enormous amount of time that has passed and that evolution is operating on the order of millions of years. Also, if you want further proof of dinosaurs having gone extinct, there's the Yucatan Peninsula. There's evidence there of a crater where a meteor hits and basically caused the extinction of the dinosaurs. So since the extinction of the dinosaurs, there was basically many millions of years.
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Human genetic variation and the genotype-phenotype problem 1

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