Public policy to reduce antibiotic resistance

Published on January 6, 2010 Reviewed on July 24, 2015   51 min

Other Talks in the Series: Antibiotic Resistance

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This is a presentation with the title, Public Policy to Reduce Antibiotic Resistance, by Niels Frimodt-Moller. I'm from Denmark. I am a specialist in clinical microbiology and adjunct professor at Aarhus University in Jutland, Denmark. I am the head of antibiotic research at the National Center for Antimicrobials and Infection Control at the Statens Serum Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark. My talk will cover the following points: factors of importance for
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low antibiotic use such as examples of correlation between antibiotic resistance and antibiotic consumption, factors of importance for antibiotic consumption and how to maintain a low use, Importance of diagnostic microbiology also at the general practitioner level, and most of the talk will be based on the Danish experience, especially because Denmark has a very low use of antibiotics and a relative low antibiotic resistance level of most human pathogens.
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The first example of antibiotic resistance prevalences is taken from the EARSS homepage. EARSS is the European Antibiotic Resistance Surveillance System, which is a system to which all European countries report antibiotic resistance on selected human pathogens. This example has shown the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, that is MRSA, in all the European countries reporting to EARSS. And the colors denote the prevalences, from light green being a low prevalence of below one percent, and then up through the colors turning more red and finally, violet to a level of over 50 percent of all Staph. aureus strains being methicillin resistance. And as you can see, there is a tendency for the Northern European countries to have low prevalences, that is Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Finland, have prevalences below five percent together with Holland. And then the prevalence increases down through Europe to prevalence rates of between 25 and 50 percent in the southern European countries. This was in 2007.
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Public policy to reduce antibiotic resistance

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