National and international surveillance of antibiotic resistance 2

Published on December 31, 2009 Updated on August 31, 2016   50 min

Other Talks in the Series: Antibiotic Resistance

0:00
Hello, I'm Professor David Livermore of the University of East Anglia and Public Health England's lead on surveillance of antibiotic resistance. And I wanted to pick up now in the second part of this presentation on national and international surveillance of antibiotic resistance.
0:23
We're going to look at some sets of surveillance data, both routine data collection and sentinel surveillances. And also how these systems can be used to asses the success and failure of different interventions aiming to control resistance.
0:48
Having said all those caveats, let's now go on to look at several national and international surveillance systems. See what we can make of the data, look at what's good, look at what we have to be careful of.
1:05
And one way to do surveillance nationally or internationally is to collect routine susceptibility data. Up and down the country, let alone around the world, millions of susceptibility tests are done with disks on automated systems, Vitex, Phoenix, and such like, everyday. All those data are out there, and there is some attempt to collect them in. In the United Kingdom, the Department of Health has mandatory reporting of a few types of infections, bacteraemias due to methicillin resistance Staph. aureus. E. coli, also nowadays to Staph. aureus in general. And for a while, to outline a few slides ago, the Department of Health also collected mandatorily information on bacteraemias, due to vancomycin resistance enterococci. All that depends on the hospitals own results. Public Health England also seeks to collect in, onto a voluntary scheme, data for all bacteraemias. Hospitals are asked to report all the patients who've had a bacteraemia, the pathogens, and the susceptibility results that were obtained. And that system, it's now called second generation surveillance system, is being expanded so that it will seek all susceptibility data for all pathogens isolated at least in England. Internationally, or at least across the European Union, there's a system called EARS-net which looks at selected drug-bug combinations, in bacteraemia across a representative range of hospitals in the country, essentially about one site of million head of population.
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National and international surveillance of antibiotic resistance 2

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