HIV prevention and public health issues: a global perspective

Published on October 1, 2007 Updated on January 31, 2018   55 min

Other Talks in the Series: Retroviruses

0:00
This Henry Stewart talk is about HIV prevention, in the context of global public health. My name is Sten Vermund. I'm at the Yale University, School of Public Health.
0:14
In 2016, the World Health Organization had its data updated, and published in 2017. There are now an estimated 37 million people currently living with HIV around the world. During that year 2016, there were 1.8 million persons who were newly infected, and about one million deaths.
0:38
When one looks at a summary of the global epidemic, one sees that women are more numerous than men. And the number of children continues to number in the millions.
0:50
Since the beginning of the epidemic through the end of 2016 and the middle of 2017, 35 million persons are estimated to have lost their lives through HIV. Happily, the global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy is likely responsible for nearly 50% decline in deaths. For example, in 2005 there were an estimated 1.9 million deaths, while as I just mentioned in 2016, that has dropped to one point O. So, almost cutting the death rate in half. Survival seems to be better in women, perhaps due to earlier diagnosis related to pregnancy, and or better adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Treatment might be contributing to fewer new infections. There was an estimated 16% decline from 2010 to the present day, well let's say 2016. Among adolescents young adults unfortunately, incidence is remaining high, and it's higher among females than males particularly in Africa. Hence, we continue to have a tremendous challenge in the prevention of HIV arena.
Hide

HIV prevention and public health issues: a global perspective

Embed in course/own notes