Surveillance, prevention, and control of vector-borne diseases 1

Published on November 28, 2021   36 min

A selection of talks on Infectious Diseases

0:00
My name is Jonathan Day. I'm a Professor Emeritus at the University of Florida where I spent my entire career studying vector-borne diseases.
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For this talk, we're going to use four model systems to discuss the surveillance and prevention and control of vector-borne diseases. These will be the St. Louis encephalitis virus in Florida, Dengue virus in Florida, West Nile virus in North America, and Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus in North America.
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What is the purpose of vector-borne disease surveillance? The primary purpose of surveillance is to detect the presence of a pathogen or a virus that is a virus-borne disease.
0:52
For example, in Miami-Dade County in 2019, there was an outbreak of the West Nile virus in downtown Miami and this slide shows the early beginnings of that outbreak. This is from July 5th, 2020 and at that point there were at least 18 cases of human disease in Miami. That was how the West Nile virus was detected in Miami- it was the presence of human cases. Surveillance, human case surveillance, allowed early identification of West Nile virus transmission in Miami and it's identified that there was a reemergence of this vector-borne disease, West Nile Virus in the southeastern United States.
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Surveillance, prevention, and control of vector-borne diseases 1

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