Artificial intelligence in medicine: history & state of the art

Published on October 31, 2019   32 min

Other Talks in the Category: Pharmaceutical Sciences

0:00
Hello. My name's John Fox. I'm going to be talking about "Artificial Intelligence in Medicine". It's the first talk of two. The first is I'm going to talk a bit about the history of the field and the state of the art and then in the second lecture, I'll talk about how we can transfer from the current stage of the field into large-scale use of these technologies in clinical practice. I am going to use for examples a particular set of techniques and applications from work in Oxford University where I'm from, and also Cancer Research UK. But do bear in mind that this is one particular set of techniques and there is a huge amount of work out there which some of you may want to follow up on. I also work for a company called Deontics that has advanced products in this area, commercial basis. And I'm chairman of a non-profits company which I'll talk about later called OpenClinical.
1:01
The starting point for this lecture is something that we all know. We make mistakes, we've known it for a long time. Francois de La Rochefoucauld has often quoted his famous quote, "Everyone complains about their memory but no-one complaints about their judgment." By which he meant and we all like to believe that well, we might not be responsible if we forget things or don't know things. But basically,you know, we're good at decision-making. The truth is that we as human beings often made kind of quite bad errors in our decision-making. Herbert Simon and Daniel Kahneman who were two psychologists who have developed the huge amount of work in human decision-making and both of them in fact got the Nobel Prizes for their work, identified a whole set of reasons why people as individuals and in organizations make mistakes. And Alan Rector, professor at Manchester University who works in Medical OWL for many years, and he said, "Medicine is a humanly impossible task." There's just too much to do, too much to know, too little time and getting everything right is impossible, and it gets worse as the field of medicine grows, and that would be a theme of the talk.
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Artificial intelligence in medicine: history & state of the art

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