Comparing transcriptomes of distant organisms: the comparative ENCODE resource 1

Published on August 31, 2017   33 min

Other Talks in the Series: From DNA to Proteins

0:00
This is Mark Gerstein and I'm the Albert Williams Professor of Biomedical Informatics at Yale and I work on things to do with genomics and personal genomics and so forth. And today, I'm going to be talking about comparing the transcriptomes of distant organisms.
0:21
I'm going to introduce the idea of how we might think about annotating the human genome. And so, the word annotate of course, was not developed for genomics. It was developed for what we do with human text. So, on this slide, you can see a human text. And so the annotations that you see are certain bits of text, they're colored out with different colors, other bits of text are kind of circled and so forth. And what I've attempted to do with the coloring is I have tried to highlight the function of different bits of text. Obviously, there's a title, there's an introductory paragraph, there's a quote and so forth. And then the things in dash, you can see there are regions that are repeated. So, one way that people often annotate text in a literary context is they'll look at how a piece of text repeats an idea both internally, within that piece of text or repeats an idea or even verbatim some words related to another text. So, for instance, here, I've highlighted the word programmer, which is repeated a lot in this particular text. So, those are the ways that we might annotate a famous text like the Bible and so forth, looking at repeat concepts and the function of various paragraphs. And so we're going to do the same thing on the next slide with the human genome.
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Comparing transcriptomes of distant organisms: the comparative ENCODE resource 1

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