Chronic orofacial pain (COFP) disease or symptom? 2

Published on July 31, 2017   43 min

Other Talks in the Series: Oral & Maxillofacial Medicine

0:04
Pulpal pain versus Periodontal pain. Let's talk about Odontogenic pain. These are algorithms, I'm always a little loath to discuss with dentists, because we have this skill set. We know pulpal pain and it's presentation, and pain in the periodontal. This is something that we have really done well from an acute pain perspective, and I'd like you to think of it from my perspective. We've done more than just modify the pain algorithm, we've done something very very very special, and that is, we have managed those, and kept those acute injuries from trending chronic. Many people believe the other entry into chronic pain, is through poorly managed acute, and so, this is something I think that dental community does Well.
0:45
Pulpal pain is very specific, is often described as a visceral pain, it's all or none. It's sort of a lack of proprioception. It's difficult to localized pain that is purely pulpal. These nerves show a high degree of convergence. When we test these neurons, in the nucleus caudalis, we know that Dr. Sessle would show that they converge from multiple tooth pulps. Periodontal pain, is more of a musculoskeletal type pain.
Hide

Chronic orofacial pain (COFP) disease or symptom? 2

Embed in course/own notes