Red lesions: autoimmune and malignant conditions

Published on March 30, 2017   40 min

Other Talks in the Series: Oral & Maxillofacial Medicine

0:00
The next component of this presentation
0:02
will deal with non-neoplastic inflammatory diseases highlighted by lichen planus. We will segue through other inflammatory conditions which are immune-mediated and terminate with precancer and cancer, highlighted by the initial erythroplasia, a highly worrisome problem that leads to, in most cases, squamous cancer or severe precancerous changes.
0:28
So we will begin with discussing lichen planus and its various forms. This can be a serious chronic problem involving the oral cavity alone or can involve the skin and other sites, including those of the areas of the scalp, flexor surface of the forearms, the pretibial region of the legs, gynecological involvement, scalp involvement, nail involvement, esophageal involvement. So this is not necessarily an oral disease only by any means.
0:57
Several facts about lichen planus, up to 1% of the population is affected. And those numbers will vary depending upon the literature sources you choose to quote. As evidenced in my practice, most of my lichen planus patients tend to be women, half or more of cutaneous lichen planus can accompany oral lichen planus in women. Average age of onset of oral lichen planus tends to be middle-aged years. The duration of the problem before attention is drawn to it can vary from weeks to months to years, in fact, and there are variable clinical presentations which we will demonstrate.
Hide

Red lesions: autoimmune and malignant conditions

Embed in course/own notes