Myiasis in humans and other animals, including applied applications in larval therapy & forensic entomology

Published on October 26, 2010   49 min

Other Talks in the Series: Vector-Borne Diseases

0:00
Hello. My name is Jamie Stevens and I'm based in the School of Biosciences at the University of Exeter. This talk forms part of the series on vector-borne diseases and will focus on myiasis in humans and other animals, and will include brief reviews of the applied topics of larval therapy and forensic entomology. This work, and indeed my research generally, have benefited from collaboration with many colleagues in the UK, Europe, Africa, North and South America, Australia, and New Zealand, many of whom have also been kind enough to provide some of the photographs used in the presentation. Full acknowledgements are given at the end of the talk. Additionally, however, I would particularly like to thank one of my recent PhD graduates, Dr. Laura McDonagh, for excellent work in this field, and in helping to prepare this presentation.
0:49
This talk will cover six main topic areas, as outlined on the slide. Firstly, we will define myiasis, and we will look at types of myiasis. And specifically, we will look at what is and what is not myiasis. Secondly, we will review the various agents of myiasis, including their biology and life histories. Thirdly, we will look at the evolution of parasitism, and in particular, the myiasis habit. Fourthly, we will look at control and intervention strategies. And finally, parts five and six, we will look briefly at the applied topics of larval therapy and forensic entomology.
1:26
So before we go any further with the main talk, what is myiasis? Well, I'm not going to say too much at this stage. We will look at formal definitions of myiasis in the next few slides. For the moment, I just want to show you a couple of typical larval infestations of a living vertebrate host so you're familiar with the type of disease condition that constitutes myiasis. On the left, we can see two cases of obligate myiasis in the hooves of goats. The top picture is an infestation with Old World screwworm fly, Chrysomya bezziana. In this case, it was from Malaysia. The lower picture is an infestation with Wohlfahrtia magnifica. This is a common parasite of livestock throughout the southern Mediterranean, the Middle East, and parts of Asia. On the right, we see two non-obligate, or facultative, myiases, and I'll say more about these terms in a minute. The lower right picture is of a typical case of sheep blowfy strike. As you can see, the larvae of the green bottle fly, Lucilia sericarta, thrive in the humid, soiled wool of the sheep. The upper right picture is a secondary infestation with larvae of the corn bluebottle, Calliphora vicina. In this case, the host animal was already dead. Typically, bluebottles are carrion flies and will only feed at the site of the pre-existing wound and when the host is already close to death. One final point to remember with myiasis is that, unlike with many other vector-borne diseases, in myiases the vector-- the adult fly and the parasite, the larvae-- are, in fact, one in the same thing.
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Myiasis in humans and other animals, including applied applications in larval therapy & forensic entomology

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