Myiasis in humans and other animals, including applied applications in larval therapy & forensic entomology

Published on October 26, 2010   49 min

Other Talks in the Series: Vector-Borne Diseases

0:00
Hello. My name is Jamie Stevens and I'm based in the School of Biosciences at the University of Exeter. This talk forms part of the series on vector-borne diseases and will focus on myiasis in humans and other animals, and will include brief reviews of the applied topics of larval therapy and forensic entomology. This work, and indeed my research generally, have benefited from collaboration with many colleagues in the UK, Europe, Africa, North and South America, Australia, and New Zealand, many of whom have also been kind enough to provide some of the photographs used in the presentation. Full acknowledgements are given at the end of the talk. Additionally, however, I would particularly like to thank one of my recent PhD graduates, Dr. Laura McDonagh, for excellent work in this field, and in helping to prepare this presentation.
0:49
This talk will cover six main topic areas, as outlined on the slide. Firstly, we will define myiasis, and we will look at types of myiasis. And specifically, we will look at what is and what is not myiasis. Secondly, we will review the various agents of myiasis, including their biology and life histories. Thirdly, we will look at the evolution of parasitism, and in particular, the myiasis habit. Fourthly, we will look at control and intervention strategies. And finally, parts five and six, we will look briefly at the applied topics of larval therapy and forensic entomology.
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Myiasis in humans and other animals, including applied applications in larval therapy & forensic entomology

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