Hard tissue biology in human health and evolution: enamel biology

Published on October 1, 2007 Updated on June 29, 2017   44 min

Other Talks in the Category: Clinical Medicine

0:00
Hello. My name is Tim Bromage. And I'm here to present a lecture on Hard Tissue Biology in Human Health and Evolution.
0:09
There are several aspects of hard tissue biology within the health sciences that have also been the explicit focus of attention in the human evolutionary sciences. These include enamel and tooth biology, bone biology, craniofacial biology, and life history and chronobiology. In this presentation, we will focus on the first two subjects, enamel biology and bone biology. In the presentations that follow, craniofacial biology and life history and chronobiology will be examined.
0:40
It will be useful if from the outset, we describe something of the difference between osteology and hard tissue biology. An osteologist whose interest say, "Lay in the adaptations to bipedalism or walking on two legs," would for instance, look at the curvature of the spine, the shape of the rib cage, and the angle at which the thighbone approaches the lower leg, and compare these features with, for example, the same regions of a chimpanzee skeleton. This comparison would reveal the functional morphological differences between the two skeletons and it would help to explain why it is that a human walks well on two legs while a chimpanzee is more appropriately adapted to knuckle walk using all four limbs in terrestrial locomotion. Hard tissue biology takes a very different approach but one which is complementary, in which we look into the tissues themselves for describing aspects of organismal biology. The first subject will be enamel biology.
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Hard tissue biology in human health and evolution: enamel biology

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