The impact of genomic architecture and diversity on infectious diseases

Published on October 1, 2007 Updated on January 2, 2019   42 min

Other Talks in the Category: Methods

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In this talk, we will discuss "The Impact of Genomic Architecture and Diversity on Infectious Diseases". The talk will be divided into two parts. That is, human genomics and viral genomics.
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In the first half of this presentation, I will be discussing about genome architecture in eukaryotes. Eukaryotic genomes are complex and vary in size over a range of 80,000,
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but as is known that in biology, to every rule there is an exception. We have paradoxes.
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The human appears to be more complex than the butterfly and a simple plant. The human has 46 chromosomes, the butterfly 250, and the plant 1,260. The K-value paradox states that complexity does not correlate with chromosome number. The human is more complex than the unicellular amoeba,
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however, the genome size of a human is much smaller than an amoeba. Hence the C-value paradox, complexity does not correlate with genome size. The human genome has about 28,000 genes,
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the mustard genome has about 26,000 genes, the rice genome has about 50,000 genes. The human appears to be much more complex than the rice and the mustard. The N-value paradox states that complexity does not correlate with the number of genes. The life forms also differ in cell number.
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The impact of genomic architecture and diversity on infectious diseases

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