Super-resolution imaging of GPCR oligomers: applications and functional roles

Published on March 30, 2021   35 min

Other Talks in the Category: Cell Biology

0:00
Hello, my name is Aylin Hanyaloglu, I'm from the Institute of Reproductive and Developmental Biology at Imperial College London. My lecture today is about super-resolution imaging of G-protein coupled receptor oligomers and how we have applied super-resolution imaging to understand the functional roles of these GPCR interactions at the cellular and physiological level.
0:24
Here is the outline of my lecture today. I will briefly introduce the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors and specifically a particular GPCR, the gonadotrophin hormone receptors, that will be the focus of this lecture. I will then talk about the role of GPCR oligomerization in vivo through our studies of these gonadotrophin hormone receptors. Then we'll introduce single-molecule and specifically super-resolution imaging, and a particular super-resolution imaging technique called PALM, and how we've used this to study G protein-coupled receptors and gonadotrophin hormone receptors. Finally I'll then move on to how we've applied PALM in combination with other approaches, to understand the structure and functional analysis of these GPCR interactions.
1:09
This top statement is a bit of a biased statement, but what I wanted to get across with this slide is to demonstrate all the different roles that these super-family receptors play in our body. I like to think of these GPCRs not as molecular sensors of an individual cell's environment, but how we as individuals respond to our environment. They have important roles when you're happy, when you're stressed, when you're in pain, when you're sitting down to your favourite meal, watching a movie, you're activating different G protein-coupled receptors. There are lots of stimuli in our environment that we consume (or are exposed to) that are ligands for these receptors, including a number of drugs. It's perhaps not surprising that even very small changes in the activity of these receptors can result in a number of different human diseases.
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Super-resolution imaging of GPCR oligomers: applications and functional roles

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