Translating microbiome research to clinics: trends, directions and challenges

Published on September 30, 2020   37 min

Other Talks in the Therapeutic Area: Immunology & Inflammation

0:00
Hello, my name is Raj Eri. I'm an Associate Professor based at the School of Health Sciences, University of Tasmania in Australia. I work on gut terminology and gut related diseases and microbiome. This lecture is about microbiome research. As we all know, this is one of the most exciting areas of research. Today's lecture will focus on how we can translate these microbiome research into clinics where the commissions get in place. Through this lecture, I'll also be talking about the trends. What are the latest directions? Of course, what are the challenges facing this particular research?
0:42
In this particular lecture, the following topics will be discussed. Initially, I'll be introducing to what constitutes the microbiome and what are the various types of microbiome and what are the factors that affect the microbiome. In fact, we'll be covering next about the beneficial effects of microbiome in human health and then we'll move on to show some specific examples of how these microbiome could be translated to clinics with a special emphasis on fecal microbiota transplantation. The final part of the talk we'll look into the challenges and future directions in microbiome research translation.
1:27
Microbiome, or microbiota, are the commonly used terms in research in this area. Microbiota usually refers to the collective of all organisms. For example bacteria, viruses, fungi, archaea. These are the common organisms that are present within our bodies, and that's what is collectively called as microbiota. If you include the genomes of all organisms, then it is called as a microbiome. These microbiota, these are present everywhere in all our tissues and a typical healthy person of about 70 kilograms, about three percent or 2.2 kilograms constitute the microbiota. Usually they say the datas by 10-1 and in terms of genomes, it's even more about 300-1 with respect to the microbial genome. With respect to metabolism, it is amazing that the metabolism initiated or held by the microbiome is equal to that of liver. We all know that liver does hundreds of functions, including metabolic functions. It is just amazing to think how much they do to our system. No wonder this field is exploding and more importance is given to this field in terms of health and disease. Within the human system, the distributions diverse within the different sites in the human body. In terms of phyla, the majority of phyla belong to about 10, but the diversity in different sites for example, one of the microbiome, skin and vaginal or fecal microbiome is so explosive. The diversity of the microbiota is at different sites of the body.
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Translating microbiome research to clinics: trends, directions and challenges

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