Other Talks in the Category: Clinical Medicine

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Hello, my name is Peter Taylor Norman Collison, Professor of Musculoskeletal Sciences at the University of Oxford. Thank you for joining me in this Henry Stewart talk, regarding rheumatoid arthritis. In part one of this talk we're going to consider the history of rheumatoid arthritis, a presentation of the condition, and some of the issues around the pathobiology of treatments, and then we'll go on in part two of the talk to look at approaches to therapy.
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Here are my disclosures, I had the whole research grants or have been involved with consultational speaking for the following pharma companies.
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Let's start with a question, what's the commonest cause of chronic inflammatory polyarthritis? And indeed, ask also what does the nomenclature actually mean? The suffix "itis" refers to inflammation, the root "arth" actually implies a joint hence we have the English word articulate or articulated with the same root and "poly", the prefix implies many, and in this context, we're usually thinking about six or more joints. So the commonest chronic inflammatory polyarthritis is in fact rheumatoid arthritis, with a worldwide prevalence of around about 1%, and the picture illustrates somebody who has this condition, and some of the swelling in joints is evident.
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So before we come on to think about the more recent developments in rheumatoid arthritis, we'll start off by considering history. The first description of this condition was in the 18th century, and Garrod was the person who first coined the term rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid by the way comes from the Greek root "rheum", which means to flow because the symptoms often move from one part of the body to another. And over the years, they've been evolving concepts of disease definition, causation and therapy and then we'll explore many of these issues together, in this talk. So what about the prevalence and outcome of rheumatoid arthritis?