Usage of vaccines and therapeutics in public health emergencies 1

Published on February 27, 2020   28 min

Other Talks in the Therapeutic Area: Infectious Diseases

0:00
Hello. My name is Professor Gary Kobinger. I'm the Director of the Infectious Disease Center at the University of Laval, Quebec, Canada. I'm a Professor in the Department of Infectious Disease, Immunology, and Microbiology. Today's title is the Usage of Vaccines and Therapeutics in Public Health Emergencies with a focus on the Ebola virus. In the first part, I will be covering the burden of infectious diseases and introducing some concepts of outbreak responses and tools that can be deployed to better control the outbreak and bring them to an end.
0:37
This slide shows the global leading causes of death worldwide, and what you can see on the slide is that infectious diseases are a big proportion of the causes of death in the human population at 26 percent, which is comparable to cardiovascular diseases, and is double the numbers of cancer, which is quite remarkable. One thing in Western society is that the awareness of cancer is higher than infectious disease. Infectious disease is clearly a big burden on public health. So, on this pop-up coming up, what you see is from 2002-2015, the decrease of this burden caused by infectious disease on the human population in terms of mortality rates. You see that about 10 million people were actually saved mainly by 2 interventions, and that reduced the number of cases. Those two interventions are something that needed a lot of work, which is triple therapy to treat HIV infections. The second one is a very basic approach. It was to distribute bed nets impregnated with mosquito repellent to prevent malaria, especially to children less than five years old. So, an infant who lives where malaria can be quite severe, is responsible for a high number of deaths to these children, can be protected.
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Usage of vaccines and therapeutics in public health emergencies 1

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