Novel approaches to treating symptoms and slowing the progress of neurodegenerative diseases

Published on March 28, 2019   42 min

Other Talks in the Category: Neuroscience

0:00
My name is Andrew Tobin. I'm at the University of Glasgow at the Center for Translational pharmacology. I'd like to present to you our work that we've been doing for, I would say over the last 10 or 20 years, looking at novel ways of treating the symptoms and slowing the progression of neurodegenerative disease.
0:21
The structure of this lecture will be around a brief description of dementia and current treatments that are aimed really at symptomatic treatments for Alzheimer's disease. Then, I'll be asking what are the best disease models in which to study Alzheimer's disease, and I'll be looking at our work using prion disease and asking whether the prion disease mimics some of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Then, I'm going into asking whether or not we can target the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors to restore memory deficits in neurodegeneration. A key feature, then, of the lecture will be to ask whether or not we need to tailor the drugs, particularly targeting the muscarinic receptor for different stages of Alzheimer's disease, where we might need different levels of modulation of disease. Finally, bearing in mind the adverse responses that many treatments have for Alzheimer's disease, asking whether we can develop methods by which we can reduce adverse responses, and therefore, have chronic treatment of disease that will slow the progression of neurodegenerative disease. So, that's the outline of the current lecture.
1:31
So, as many of you will know, the feature of Alzheimer's disease is, of course, severe neuronal loss, resulting in a terminal disease state- patients die of Alzheimer's disease in the end. Alzheimer's disease and dementia are associated with big numbers. So, as we go through this slide, you'll see that currently, worldwide 50 million people have dementia. It's predicted to double every 20 years. By 2030, there'll be more than 65 million people, and by 2050 over 115 million people with dementia. Actually, strangely enough, the biggest growth in dementia is in the developing countries and countries outside of Europe and the United States because that's where the aging population is increasing the most. So, it's usually is associated with a Western disease, but that is actually not true. It's a worldwide problem, and there are 10 million people with dementia in Europe at the moment. By 2040, dementia will be second to cancer as a cause of morbidity in the first world. Among these big numbers, there is a number that's missing, and that is that there are currently no drug treatments that can slow or change the progression of neurodegenerative disease, so-called modify the disease. The world and the pharmaceutical industry at the moment are turning their attention to this problem in various ways, not just through the industry, but through academia, and not least through the Dementia Research Institute that's just being set up by the Medical Research Council in Alzheimer's, the UK, in the United Kingdom.
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Novel approaches to treating symptoms and slowing the progress of neurodegenerative diseases

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