Sjögren's Syndrome: current knowledge and future prospects

Published on November 29, 2018   44 min

Other Talks in the Therapeutic Area: Immunology & Inflammation

0:00
My name is Athanasios Tzioufas. I'm Professor of Medicine and Rheumatology in the department of Pathophysiology in the School of Medicine in Athens. My mission today is to present our current knowledge and future prospects on Sjogren's syndrome.
0:16
Sjogren's syndrome or also called autoimmune epithelitis is a common disease since it affects 0.5 to one percent of adult females. As you see, there are nine females versus one male that they are affected from the disease. As you will see in the next slides, it has a wide clinical spectrum including organ-specific disease affecting only the excrete glands. It can be in the form of systemic disease, and finally some patients, around five percent, may end by developing non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma. Sjogren's syndrome has an easy lesion to be studied that is the minor salivary glands. It can be taken without significant morbidity from patients. By studying this lesion, it can also share as a paradigm for other autoimmune disorders.
1:17
Sjogren's syndrome is a disease that affects ladies, as I told you previously, particularly in the middle ages. You see in the slide that with the red dot line, the disease is appear usually in the middle ages, I told you, the peak around the middle age of 50's, but the onset of the disease come several years earlier. There are also some clinical forms of the disease, as you see here, that is normal individuals that they may have autoantibodies of Sjogren's syndrome before the disease develop. So, between the onset of symptoms at diagnosis, they are usually seven years elapsed.
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Sjögren's Syndrome: current knowledge and future prospects

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