Patient heterogeneity in dose-finding trials - part 2: more than 2 groups

Published on June 28, 2018   20 min

Other Talks in the Series: Adaptive Clinical Trial Design

0:00
Hello, my name is Mark Conaway. I'm a professor in the Division of Translational Research and Applied Statistics in the Department of Public Health Sciences at the University of Virginia. This talk is on patient heterogeneity in dose-finding trials. Part 2 focuses on trials conducted in more than two groups. There's also a part one that focuses on trial done in exactly two groups.
0:23
The outline for this talk is that I'll first provide motivating examples for trials done in three or more groups. Then I'll discuss some of the existing statistical methods for the design of trials in three or more groups. First was published by Yuan and Chappell in 2004. Then, I'll talk about a couple of papers recently published that discuss completely or partially ordered groups. I'll define what I mean by completely or partially ordered groups in the context to dose-finding. A study done in four groups presented by Ramanathan et al in 2008.
0:51
Prior to assigning doses, patients were grouped into categories based on the degree of liver dysfunction at baseline. Patients were grouped into either none, mild, moderate, severe levels of liver dysfunction. A similar grouping was used in a dose-finding study reported by LoRusso et al in 2012.
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Patient heterogeneity in dose-finding trials - part 2: more than 2 groups

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