Genetic methods in the study of neurological diseases: the genetic basis of neurological disorders

Published on July 1, 2014   38 min

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My name is Jose Bras. I am a researcher at the Institute of Neurology at UCL in London. And in this lecture, I'm going to try and talk a little bit about the genetic methods that we're currently using in the study of neurological diseases.
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So in neurogenetics, we currently have two main aims in the study of disease. The first one, I'd say, is when we want to identify the genetic cause of a condition when a condition is seen as segregating in a family, for example, and we don't know which gene is causing the disorder. So that's one of the main goals that we have. The second one is perhaps finding genetic variants that modulate the risk of an individual by increasing it or decreasing it to develop a condition, and also best genetic variants that modulate the progression of a disease. And both these things are incredibly important and have widespread implications, not just for the patients themselves, but particularly because they help us understand how and why the disease starts and how and why it progresses.
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Genetic methods in the study of neurological diseases: the genetic basis of neurological disorders

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