Role of polycomb proteins in gene transcription, stem cell and human diseases

Published on February 4, 2014   37 min

Other Talks in the Series: Epigenetics, Chromatin, Transcription and Cancer

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Role of Polycomb Proteins in Gene Description, Stem Cells and Human Diseases, by Luciano Di Croce, from the Gene Regulation, Stem cell, and Cancer Department, ICREA, and Center for Genomic Regulation, Barcelona, Spain.
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The DNA of eukaryotic cells is organized in chromatin fibers, where the nucleosome forms the basic repeating unit. Each nucleosome comprises 147 base pairs of DNA, which is wrapped in 1.8 elegant turn around an octamer of four highly [INAUDIBLE] conserved histone protein, which are histone H two A, histone H two B, histone H three, and histone H four. These four structure, which is often called as 11 nanometer fibers. The histone H1 lines to deliver DNA between two addition nucleosomes, causing further compaction of the chromatin fibers into higher order structure, often refer as a solenoid or as 30 nanometer fibers. The analyses of the crystal structure of the nucleosome, which was solved in 1998 by the group of Luger and Richmond, reveal that on terminal a part of the histone tail are flexible and protrude outside from the nucleosome core. The histone tail undergoes a large number of post-translational modifications.
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Role of polycomb proteins in gene transcription, stem cell and human diseases

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