Systemic lupus erythematosus: novel aspects of pathogenesis and treatment 1

Published on October 1, 2007 Updated on March 31, 2019   24 min

Other Talks in the Category: Immunology

0:00
Ladies and gentlemen, my name is Chaim Putterman. It gives me great pleasure to introduce to you today's lecture titled "Systemic Lupus Erythematosus," or SLE, with a focus on "Novel Aspects of Pathogenesis and Treatment." This is an update of a lecture that I provided several years ago to Henry Stewart Talks. There's been a tremendous amount of progress, both in understanding pathogenesis of lupus and in treatment modalities, and we thought it was time to update and provide the new information. Today's talk is being given by Noa Schwartz from the Hospital for Special Surgery, and myself, Chaim Putterman, from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center in New York.
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Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, or lupus, is an autoimmune systemic disease that can affect many organ systems in many different ways. While previously it was thought to be primarily antibody-driven, it is now known that all parts of the immune system contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. Therefore, before we go on to discuss what goes wrong in the immune system of lupus patients, we would like to briefly first present a general overview of the healthy immune system, its main players, and some of its regulatory processes. It is important to emphasize that we do not intend to present here an exhaustive description of the intricacies of the immune system, but rather to provide a basic, yet, we hope, insightful, understanding, of the main players that are thought to be related to the pathogenesis of lupus. So the immune system is divided into innate immunity and adaptive immunity. The innate immune system is considered the first line of defense against pathogens. It is always there providing universal protection without a need for priming to begin working effectively. Adaptive immunity, however, is pathogen- or antigen-specific and usually more potent but requires priming prior to activation. Therefore, it takes more time to reach its full protective potential.
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Systemic lupus erythematosus: novel aspects of pathogenesis and treatment 1

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