The catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome and the microangiopathic antiphospholipid syndrome

Published on October 1, 2007 Reviewed on May 17, 2017   38 min

Other Talks in the Series: Autoimmunity

0:00
Today's talk concentrates on the Antiphospholipid Syndromes and Variants in 2006, including the Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome, known as CAPS, as well as the newly delineated Microangiopathic Antiphospholipid Syndrome, termed MAPS. A few historical facts.
0:24
The great Virchow's postulates at the end of the 19th century, to explain thrombosis consisted of stasis of the blood, vessel wall abnormalities, and blood abnormalities. And it is of interest that more than a hundred years later, these postulates still hold true.
0:43
Wassermann in 1906, first documented a serological diagnostic test for Syphilis, and this serodiagnostic reaction, in fact forms the basis for the Phospholipid Syndrome more than 80 years later.
1:01
Many papers, in fact had been published from 1963 onwards, on the Lupus anticoagulant and its associations with thrombosis, recurrent fetal losses, and thrombocytopenia.
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However, in 1983, there was a major advance in this field, which was due to the discovery of the anticardiolipin antibodies in the laboratories of Graham Hughes at the Hammersmith Hospital in London by Nigel Harris and Azzudin Gharavi. From 1983 onwards, Hughes himself, as well as Ronald Asherson, his close associate, and the many fellows who trained in this unit from 1980 to 1990, then proceeded to describe the major clinical associations of these antibodies. Here follows a slide with a picture of Nigel Harris at that time,
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The catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome and the microangiopathic antiphospholipid syndrome

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