Reaching the missing millions through public-private mix (PPM) for TB prevention and care

Published on May 31, 2022   33 min

Other Talks in the Category: Microbiology

0:00
Greetings. This is Hannah Monica Dias from the World Health Organization Global Tuberculosis Program. I lead the work at WHO on reaching the millions of people with TB prevention and care through the flagship initiative, Find, Treat All, End TB, through efforts on public-private mix or or public-private partnerships which help strengthen engagement with all care providers, this is the topic for the talk today. I also lead the work on TB elimination.
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The main focus of this talk is to reach the missing millions of people who don't access TB prevention or care services, or they miss out on accessing lifesaving TB prevention and care services. One of the core approaches to achieving this is called public-private mix (PPM). Public-private mix is a key component of WHO's End TB strategy. We've had policies spanning decades on this, but it's only recently that we've seen that public-private mix is being slowly-scaled up by countries. What does PPM really mean? PPM, or public-private mix, encompasses diverse collaborative strategies. It refers to public-public mix, which basically means engagement by the national TB program of public sector care providers that are not directly linked to national TB programs. This can be public hospitals like in Indonesia, public medical colleges like in India, prisons or detention centers, military facilities, railways, public health insurance organizations like in a lot of Latin America. Often, these unengaged public sector care providers manage a lot of people with TB, but they don't necessarily report them to national programs and so we don't know what kind of care they're receiving, or if the right guidelines are being followed. It's really important to make sure that public sector comprehensive engagement is achieved, especially if you know from an analysis of the patient pathway in countries that the public unengaged care providers are actually a part of a big provision of care for people with TB, so it's really important to engage with them. The second strategy is public-private mix, and this refers to the engagement by the national TB program of private sector care providers, especially in countries with a large private sector and this can include private individual and institutional providers, the corporate or business sector, mission hospitals, nongovernmental organizations and faith-based organizations. In a nutshell, we are looking both at public-public mix and public-private mix to make sure that all care providers are engaged in efforts to end TB.
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Reaching the missing millions through public-private mix (PPM) for TB prevention and care

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