Introduction to the peripheral nervous system

Published on May 31, 2020   23 min
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My name is Samuel Asala, Professor of Anatomical Sciences from the College of Health Sciences at the University of Abuja, Nigeria. The title of this talk is: Introduction to the Peripheral Nervous System.
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The objectives of this lecture are to define the functional relationship between the peripheral nervous system and other parts of the nervous system, to describe the structures that constitute the peripheral nervous system and to differentiate between the somatic and autonomic nervous components of the peripheral nervous system. You will be able to name the 12 cranial nerves in relation to their functions, and group the spinal nerves and relate them to nerve plexuses that are associated with them.
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The plan of the lecture is as shown on this slide.
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The central nervous system is functionally similar to the central processing unit or the processor and hard drive of the computer. Two types of computer peripherals, the input and the output, enable the user to interact with the computer. Inputs receive information from the user, and outputs give information to the user in response to the commands of the central processing unit. These peripherals are equivalent to the afferent and efferent nerve processes in the nervous system. The nerve processes constitute the peripheral nervous system.
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The general function of the nervous system may be illustrated by a 'Report, Process & Command, Delivery' system. A group of nerves called afferent nerves, by means of the impulses carried in them, report events in different parts of the body to the central nervous system. The central nervous system receives and processes the information, stores some of the information and the results of the processing in the memory, some of the afferent information bypasses the main processing areas of the central nervous system and gets stored in memory. The interplay between information processing and memory parts of the central nervous system influences the future responses of the central nervous systems to similar impulses. At the end of the information processing, the central nervous system issues commands. These commands are passed along another group of nerves called the efferent nerves, to peripheral target organs such as muscles and glands. Afferent and efferent nerves constitute the peripheral nervous system. The nervous system is an aggregate of nerve tissue that regulates and
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Introduction to the peripheral nervous system

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