Photoreceptor protection: significance of docosanoids and elovanoids 2: bioactive derivatives of DHA

Published on September 26, 2019   40 min
0:00
This is Nicolas G. Bazan from LSU Neuroscience Center of Excellence at Louisiana State University School of Medicine in New Orleans. I would like, in the second part, to introduce bioactive derivatives of docosahexaenoic acid. It's a little farther synthesis of what I have shown you up to now in the context, again,
0:16
of the importance of adiponectin reciprocal 1 as an integral membrane protein necessary for the maintenance of photoreceptor cell structure and function because of the ablation of adiponectin recipient 1 leads to number 1, flecked retina and photoreceptor cell degeneration; secondly, attenuated electroretinogram and prolonged dark recovery; thirdly, impaired retinal visual cycle; fourth, adiponectin knockout- the cognate ligand does not display retinal degeneration phenotype. It is very interesting that after the paper that reported on the adiponectin receptor knockout, many other studies began pointing out too, for example, mutations of a single amino acid in the adiponectin receptor 1 that lead to retinitis pigmentosa. In fact, they may explain as many as 40-45 percent of the cases of retinitis pigmentosa. Previous studies have suggested that certain Finnish populations that have age-related macular degeneration display polymorphisms in adiponectin receptor 1 assume variance.
1:39
That is actually in the next slide, the top one is a paper that refers to a mutation in the AdipoR1 as causing nonsyndromic autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. The second reference there is the AdipoR1 mutated in, again, retinitis pigmentosa from another group. The bottom one is actually the body and associated with advance age-related macular degeneration in a Finnish population.
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Photoreceptor protection: significance of docosanoids and elovanoids 2: bioactive derivatives of DHA

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