Current thinking in back pain management - introduction

Published on July 30, 2015   4 min

A selection of talks on Clinical Practice

0:00
Hello and welcome to this series which we'll discuss current thinking in back pain management. My name is Anna Hlavsova, and I'm a physiotherapist, and one of the editors of this series. I would like to give you a brief introduction, which will outline the talks in this series.
0:18
This series about back pain will contain talks about biomechanics, interacting systems of back pain, pain management, physiotherapy, psychosocial flags, and combined physical and psychological programs.
0:33
Back pain is a worldwide problem, with high prevalence rates and large impact on those suffering. It is estimated that about 8 out of 10 people will get back pain at some point in their lives. Chronic back pain, especially, is a very costly problem. And it costs the EU in excess of 12 billion euros. It is the number one cause of disability worldwide and is consuming more and more finances and healthcare resources every year. Low back pain without radicular pain is the most common musculoskeletal complaint of people presenting to their GPs. In the UK more than 100 million working days per year are lost because of back pain. This poses increasing costs to society, increasing chronicity around the world. This series will discuss some of the key issues and the main research areas in back pain.
1:24
There are many theories about the various causes of back pain. However, it is highly unlikely that there is just one cause. It is a combination of biological, psychological, and social factors, which is quite individual for every person. So what do we know so far about biomechanics of back pain? Well, this will be answered in one of the upcoming talks. However, a purely biological perspective is not enough, because it does not explain that there are many people with herniated discs and asymptomatic findings on MRIs, but they haven't got any pain. So the next talk, we'll discuss if low back pain is a composite of interacting systems.
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Current thinking in back pain management - introduction

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