Mitochondrial and lysosomal dysfunction in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease

Published on December 2, 2014   35 min
0:00
Hello, my name is Tony Schapira. I'm going to talk to you today about mitochondrial and lysosomal dysfunction in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Parkinson's disease is a common disorder. Indeed, it is the second commonest neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer's disease. It's anticipated that the total number of people in the world with Parkinson's disease will double by 2030. This is a consequence of increased life expectancy of people, and reflects the increasing incidence of Parkinson's disease with age.
0:38
Several biochemical abnormalities have been associated with the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease, and, of course, ultimately, with the etiology of this disorder; these include mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, intracellular calcium homeostasis, excitotoxicity, inflammation, protein misfolding, accumulation, aggregation, and, of course, now we know that this may also include abnormal propagation of proteins, apoptosis, and autophagy, which includes mitophagy, the turnover of mitochondria, and lysosomal dysfunction.
Hide

Mitochondrial and lysosomal dysfunction in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease

Embed in course/own notes