Vitiligo: in vivo and in vitro evidence for epidermal ROS/RNS-mediated regulation / dysregulation

Published on November 4, 2014   37 min
0:00
My topic today is to speak about vitiligo. And I'm going to present some in vivo and in vitro evidence of epidermal Reactive Oxygen Species and Reactive Nitrogen Species-mediated regulation or dysregulation in this disease.
0:15
The vitiligo is affecting, of course, mostly the skin. And since the skin is the largest, outer-most organ of the human body, it has an approximate size of 1.85 to 2 square meter. It's responsible for the protection of our human body against many environmental stress; for example, radicals, chemicals, heat, cold, water, and so on. So I'm going to explain on the next slide how the layers of the skin is actually composed, especially about the epidermal part of the skin.
0:52
The outermost layer is composed of the epidermis and the dermis and subcutis, as seen in this slide here. The majority of the epidermis is constructed of keratinocytes. This is the melanocytes at the basement membrane. One melanocyte is surrounded by 36 keratinocytes and forming the so-called epidermal unit. At the basement membrane, and we have the stratum basale. That's the proliferation zone of the epidermis, followed by the stratum spinosum and then the stratum corneum. And those are the parts we are interested in right now.
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Vitiligo: in vivo and in vitro evidence for epidermal ROS/RNS-mediated regulation / dysregulation

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