Stem cells derived from amniotic fluid and placenta

Published on March 5, 2014   30 min
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This is Anthony Atala from the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. And I will be discussing the topic of stem cells derived from amniotic fluid and placenta.
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The amniotic fluid is the fluid that surrounds the developing embryo and fetus, and the placenta is a tissue that surrounds both the developing embryo and fetus as well as the fluid. Interestingly, both of these sources, the fluid and the tissue, are present all the way until the time that the baby is delivered.
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Both the amniotic fluid and the placenta can be obtained any time after a certain period, during gestation, all the way through term. Amniocentesis is a procedure where amniotic fluid gets obtained anywhere between 14 weeks of gestation all the way through term. And that is where we obtain the amniotic fluid. Chorionic villus sampling is a procedure where we obtain a small piece of a placenta any time between 12 weeks through term. Both techniques are widely accepted methods for the prenatal diagnosis of the fetus or the embryo, and it can be done all the way through the time of birth. It is well known that both amniotic fluid and the placenta are full of the developing fetus cells. However, what we postulated about 10 years ago, whether these sources could in fact be a possible source for stem cells.
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Stem cells derived from amniotic fluid and placenta

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