Gene expression analysis of pluripotent stem cells

Published on March 5, 2014   25 min
0:00
Hi. My name is Uma Lakshmipathy. I'm with the stem cell R&D at Life Technologies. My research team is involved in the development or reprogramming tools and platforms for stem cell characterization. Today, I would like to share our studies on the use of gene expression data for the identification of novel markers and for rapid characterization and standardization of pluripotent stem cells.
0:26
I'll start off with a brief introduction on pluripotent stem cells followed by current methods used to characterize these cells. I would then like to share two recent studies. The first study describes development of a focus gene expression panel for confirming function and pluripotencies of ESC and iPSC lines. This method relies on monitoring the expression of cell renewal and lineage markers in undifferentiated pluripotent cells and in their corresponding differentiating cells. The second study is focused on identification of CD44 as a negative mark of pluripotent cells.
1:07
Pluripotent stem cells, or PSCs, are cells that have the potential to differentiate into nearly every type of cell found in the body. This potential makes them valuable research tools for many different applications, including drug discovery, disease modeling, and regenerative medicine. Prior to 2006, the primary source of pluripotent stem cells was embryonic stem cells, or ESCs, which are harvested from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst early stage embryo. In 2006, Shinya Yamanaka and colleagues published a landmark paper describing the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPSCs, by reprogramming. Reprogramming is a process wherein an adult somatic cell, such as a dermal fibroblast, can be induced to turn into a cell that is pluripotent and is essentially indistinguishable from an ESC.
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Gene expression analysis of pluripotent stem cells

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