Chaperone systems of the endoplasmic reticulum

Published on February 20, 2012   49 min

Other Talks in the Series: Protein Homeostasis

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Hi, I'm Linda Hendershot, The Department of Tumor Cell Biology at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee. I'll be talking about the chaperon systems of the endoplasmic reticulum.
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The ability of cells to communicate with each other and their environment in specific ways is essential to survival in multicellular organisms.
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One of the primary ways this is done is through proteins expressed on the cell surface or secreted from the cell. For example, a damaged cell or tumor cell, which requires additional nutrients or oxygen, has the ability to secrete pro-angiogenic factors which will bind to endothelial cells and stimulate the production of blood vessel and oxygen flow to the tumor cell.
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Another example is direct cell to cell communication. For example, a virus-infected cell is recognized by a T-cell of the immune system by an antigen is expressed on the cell surface, which can induce the T-cells to kill the virus-infected cell.
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Another example is the secretion of effector molecules like antibodies from plasma cells, which can target bacteria for destruction.
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Another example is the use of proteins for cellular communication can be seen in the migration of cells throughout the body or homing into specific tissues. For example, a B cell, which can be synthesized in the fetal liver or in the bone marrow, was turned to a lymph node, which occurs at the expression of proteins on the B cell surface that interacts with proteins on the surface of the lymph node. The cell surface and secreted proteins are
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Chaperone systems of the endoplasmic reticulum

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