Diseases of civilization: an evolutionary legacy

Published on October 1, 2007 Reviewed on January 11, 2016   31 min

Other Talks in the Series: Evolution and Medicine

0:00
This is Dr. Alan Weder at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan and today, we'll be talking about diseases of civilization, our evolutionary legacy. Evolutionary thinking about human disease has largely focused on the individual.
0:12
Our medical model ask questions like, what exposure did this person have that caused him to get sick? What genetic variant caused this person to develop a drug toxicity? These are important questions and I'll consider some of these types, as I examine the importance of diseases of civilization. Equally important, but not very often considered are evolutionary questions. These ask why we get sick? This type of approach seeks to explain why as organisms, we are vulnerable to diseases. It uses the historic approach and concerns issues of natural selection and phylogeny to determine how these factors interact with the more traditional mechanistic and developmental aspects of disease. The last century has seen a dramatic transition from a world of
Hide

Diseases of civilization: an evolutionary legacy

Embed in course/own notes