Nuclear Cloning, Stem Cells and Epigenetic Reprogramming

Published on October 1, 2007 Reviewed on September 21, 2015   51 min

Other Talks in the Series: Epigenetics

0:00
Nuclear cloning, stem cells, and epigenetic reprogramming, and the promise of this technology for customized tissue repair. Rudolf Jaenisch, Whitehead Institute, MIT and Cambridge. This is Dolly, the first cloned animal published no more than eight years ago.
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The cloning of mammals raised a number of complex questions. For example scientific questions, why and how does this procedure work? And more complex, should we use this technology for human applications? This of course raises scientific, practical, and importantly ethical, political, and other questions. So the problem of nuclear cloning is genomic reprogramming.
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In the case of Dolly, the donor cell was from the mammary gland. These cells express the genes appropriate for mammary gland function, not the genes which are important for embryonic development. So the transplanted nucleus must activate these embryonic genes, and that's where the problem is. Only few clones manage to activate these genes, and those which do manage to activate these genes are often not normal.
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Nuclear Cloning, Stem Cells and Epigenetic Reprogramming

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