Nucleotide dependent functioning of bacterial enhancer binding proteins, activators of sigma54 RNA polymerase

Published on October 1, 2007 Updated on December 29, 2016   47 min

Other Talks in the Series: From DNA to Proteins

0:00
Over the next 40 minutes or so, I'd like to describe our current understanding of how nucleotide-dependent transcription operates.
0:12
I would describe how one major variant sigma factor, an RNA polymerase subunit participates in this process of transcriptional activation. I'll describe in detail its activators and in particular I will describe how nucleotide, in particular ATP, causes changes in the transcriptional activator. And that will be based on recent structural studies on a transcriptional activator from E. coli, the so-called phage shock protein F, PspF, an E. coli transcriptional activator.
0:43
Bacteria use proteins called sigma factors to bring RNA polymerase to the promoter DNA. Typically, they exist in two classes, the sigma70 class which is well represented with many members. Here we see in E. coli there are one, two, three, four, five, six members of the sigma70 class. The focus of my talk is on an alternative sigma factor called sigma54, it's got a single member. Sometimes, it's only one of only two sigma factors in bacteria, and it really provides an example of a transcriptional activation mechanism that resembles eukaryotic enhancer-dependent transcriptional activation.
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Nucleotide dependent functioning of bacterial enhancer binding proteins, activators of sigma54 RNA polymerase

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