Update on EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer

Published on September 26, 2019   29 min

Other Talks in the Category: Cancer

0:00
Hi, my name is Christina Baik. I'm a Thoracic Oncologist, at the University of Washington, and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, in Seattle, Washington. Today I'll be giving you an update on EGFR mutated non-small-cell lung cancer, which is an area that has advanced significantly in the past several years.
0:21
Before I go into this topic, I'd like to start with some basic epidemiologic information on lung cancer. Globally, lung cancer has the highest mortality rate in men, and second highest in women. In the United States, lung cancer has the highest mortality and second highest incidence rate with approximately 228,000 new cases, and 143,000 deaths in 2019. In the western population, 80 percent of lung cancer is attributed to smoking, which means that about 20 percent of lung cancer patients do not have a smoking history. This number is even higher in other parts of the world, especially in East Asia. Fortunately, lung cancer incidence and mortality, at least in the United States, have been trending down, likely reflecting the decrease in smoking prevalence. There also have been other interesting changes such as, recent data showing that among the younger non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics, lung cancer incidence has become higher in women, and the reason for this is not entirely clear and really deserves further investigation.
1:27
Unfortunately, most patients are diagnosed with lung cancer at late stages which is still associated with a poor prognosis despite advances in therapy. This is data from the USCO database from 2009- 2015, which shows that almost 60 percent of patients are diagnosed when their disease has already metastasized, and the five year survival rate for these patients is still around five percent.
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Update on EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer

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