Adhesion GPCRs in nervous system development and disease

Published on May 16, 2019   36 min
0:00
Hello, everybody, my name is Tobias Langenham, and I'm a professor of Biochemistry, at the Rudolf Schönheimer Institute of Biochemistry at Leipzig University in Germany. Today, I'd like to introduce "Adhesion G-Protein-Coupled-Receptors, and their Multiple Roles in Nervous System Development and Disease".
0:22
First, I would like to introduce the superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors. The surface molecules are mounted on the edges of many cells in our bodies, and they amount to a massive battery of genes stored in the genomes of actually all animals including humans. For example, the human genome amounts and accounts more than 700 different GPCR genes. GPCRs are implicated in multiple positions within our bodily functions. For example, sensory systems that allow us to smell compounds or to see things through our eyes. They are also involved into feedback loops that are controlled, for example, by hormones. The GPCR superfamily can be divided according to different classification schemes. In the slide, you can see a subdivision that is very popular, which is termed GRAFS classification.
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Adhesion GPCRs in nervous system development and disease

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