Novel approaches to treating symptoms and slowing the progress of neurodegenerative diseases

Published on March 28, 2019   42 min
0:00
My name is Andrew Tobin. I'm at the University of Glasgow at the Center for Translational pharmacology. I'd like to present to you our work that we've been doing for, I would say over the last 10 or 20 years, looking at novel ways of treating the symptoms and slowing the progression of neurodegenerative disease.
0:21
The structure of this lecture will be around a brief description of dementia and current treatments that are aimed really at symptomatic treatments for Alzheimer's disease. Then, I'll be asking what are the best disease models in which to study Alzheimer's disease, and I'll be looking at our work using prion disease and asking whether the prion disease mimics some of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Then, I'm going into asking whether or not we can target the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors to restore memory deficits in neurodegeneration. A key feature, then, of the lecture will be to ask whether or not we need to tailor the drugs, particularly targeting the muscarinic receptor for different stages of Alzheimer's disease, where we might need different levels of modulation of disease. Finally, bearing in mind the adverse responses that many treatments have for Alzheimer's disease, asking whether we can develop methods by which we can reduce adverse responses, and therefore, have chronic treatment of disease that will slow the progression of neurodegenerative disease. So, that's the outline of the current lecture.
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Novel approaches to treating symptoms and slowing the progress of neurodegenerative diseases

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