Brain anatomy and functional differences in developmental stuttering

Published on November 30, 2017   41 min

Other Talks in the Series: Speech Dysfluency

0:00
Hello. My name is Soo-Eun Chang and I am an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Michigan. The title of my talk is Brain Anatomy and Functional Differences in Developmental Stuttering. This lecture is part of the series on speech disfluency.
0:18
Fluent speech is something that most people take for granted. It is produced naturally, effortlessly and automatically for most people. This is certainly not the case in people who stutter, dramatically demonstrated in movies such as The King's Speech. We know that fluent speech production is supported by multiple brain areas and the connections and interactions among these structures. In this lecture, I will review what these critical structures and connections are that support fluent speech and review accumulating evidence of anomalous function and anatomy in these brain areas in speakers who stutter. Here is the outline of my lecture.
0:57
I will first define neurodevelopmental disorders and point out that many features of stuttering make it consistent to be categorized as a neurodevelopmental disorder. I will then talk about the neural mechanisms supporting fluent speech and theoretical models that explain how fluent speech is generated. I will point out some specific critical, cortical and subcortical neural pathways that support fluent speech. I will give a brief review and explanation of major non-invasive neuroimaging techniques used to study brain function and anatomy in humans, and then talk about some convergent evidence mostly derived from adult speakers who stutter in the past two decades or so. I will then direct attention to the still nascent findings from young children who stutter to explain differences in brain development that are present even close to stuttering onset, which may suggest more clearly what the neural basis of stuttering may be. The lecture will conclude with future directions and research involving advanced methodology that are expected to help reveal even more detailed information on the neural mechanisms behind stuttering onset, persistence, and recovery during childhood.
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Brain anatomy and functional differences in developmental stuttering

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