Covert (interiorized) stuttering and passing as fluent

Published on August 31, 2017   34 min

Other Talks in the Series: Speech Dysfluency

0:00
Hello my name is Christopher Constantino, I'm a speech language pathologist and a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Memphis in Memphis Tennessee. The title of this lecture is "Covert Stuttering and Passing as Fluent".
0:18
In this talk I will start by introducing what it means to pass and then I will define some commonly confused terms. From there we will jump into the literature on covert stuttering and passing. We'll talk about some important historical papers, clinical observations, empirical studies, and some personal reflections written by people who pass themselves. Finally, we'll conclude with a discussion of how best to work clinically with people who pass.
0:46
So what is covert stuttering and passing? The experience of covert stuttering is relatively unknown to those outside of the field of speech language pathology. This is unsurprising, as people who covertly stutter often present as fluent speakers in their daily lives, and therefore the average listener will not realize there is anything going on. These people are said to pass as fluent. Passing has been defined as the phenomenon in which a person of one social group identifies and represents herself as a member of another. It has also been defined as when people effectively present themselves as other than who they understand themselves to be. Therefore passing as fluent is when a person who stutters identifies and represents themselves as a fluent person.
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Covert (interiorized) stuttering and passing as fluent

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