GxE interactions in genome-wide association studies

Published on November 30, 2016   51 min

Other Talks in the Series: Statistical Genetics

0:00
Hello, my name is David Conti, and I'm from the University of Southern California. And today, I am going to talk about "GxE Environment Interactions in Genome-Wide Association Studies".
0:10
Typically, in genetic association studies, we start with a phenotype. And in this example, we're starting with cigarette smoking, and the behavior of who smokes and who doesn't. From that step of the phenotype, we often try to key in on the biology and look at, who's absorbing that nicotine and how they absorb it differently, in terms of nicotine metabolism. That also then leads into effects of the brain such arousal, mood modulation, and pleasure. Over time, as individuals start ... continue to smoke, there's a build-up of tolerance and physical dependence. This leads to drug abstinence and withdrawal symptoms, when one tries to quit smoking. And then, of course, the metabolism kicks in. And there's a craving for nicotine to self-medicate that withdrawal symptoms and to smoke again. Based on this understanding of the phenotype, we often then key in more on the resolution.
1:02
We focus on the biology that's behind this. And in this slide, we can look at in the upper right figure, in the liver cell, we have nicotine going to cotinine. That's going to be a process that is mediated by certain genes, CYP2A6, CYP2B6. And then also the process of how nicotine crosses the blood brain barrier, and how that gets into the dopamine system and the neuronic system. And what genes are involved in there. Based again on that biology in a genetic context, we can move forward.
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GxE interactions in genome-wide association studies

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