An overview of human migrations

Published on June 30, 2015   39 min

You are viewing a talk that is a part of one of our comprehensive courses. Additional learning material: case studies, projects, workshops and recommended reading; multiple choice questions and suggested exam questions with model answers are available on application. Learn more

Other Talks in the Series: Human Population Genetics II

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Hello, and welcome to this talk. I'm Mark Jobling, a professor in the Department of Genetics at the University of Leicester, UK. The purpose of this talk is to give you a broad overview of human migrations and to touch on a number of topics that will be covered in more depth elsewhere in the course. I hope to provide a taster, and to inspire your interest in human population genetics. There are 7 billion of us humans living in most of the habitable area of our planet, from hot deserts to icy tundra, from low-lying plains to high mountain plateaus and tiny, isolated islands to large cities with millions of cosmopolitan inhabitants. We show a lot of phenotypic diversity. This includes obvious differences, such as hair, skin, and eye color, height and body proportions, and less obvious ones involving dietary tolerances and disease susceptibilities. How can genetics contribute to understanding how this situation came about? Studying human population history charms with our natural interest in our origins, but it also has practical uses in understanding the distribution of disease alleles and the origins and significance of phenotypic differences.