Stem cells from adipose tissue

Published on March 5, 2014   40 min
0:00
Hello, this is Adam Katz. And the title of my presentation is "Stem Cells from Adipose Tissue." I am an associate professor in the division of plastic surgery at the University of Florida.
0:14
As part of full disclosure, I would like to mention that I am a named inventor on issued and or pending patents related to the adipose field, including adipose-derived cells and matrix. And I have in the past received royalties related to this IP. I also serve on the board of directors or have been a founder on at least two companies that operate in this field.
0:40
As a brief overview for my presentation, I will be giving a brief background on the adipose-derived cell, as well as some of the past and current science related to these cells. We'll also discuss briefly some of the regulatory issues surrounding the translation of adipose-derived cells and then the translation and commercialization of these cells specifically.
1:07
To begin, let's discuss adipose tissue, which is a tissue many of us are well aware of and have learned about in medical school or other stages of training. Many of us were taught that the function of adipose tissue was simply for storing energy and providing padding to important structures. There are two main physiological subcompartments of adipose tissue. One is the parenchyma, which is the functional part of the tissue. In this case the adipocyte, which stores energy. And surrounding this is the stroma, or the connective or supportive structural framework of a tissue. In this case, lots of fibroblasts and endothelial vascular related cells. We now know that adipose tissue in extremely complex and dynamic endocrine organ. And from our standpoint, for the purpose of this talk, we'll be talking about the regenerative potential of cells and factors that are derived from this tissue.
2:06
As such, adipose tissue can now be viewed as a tremendous biological resource, in that it is extremely abundant in most individuals. And it's very easy and safe to harvest large amounts of tissue through very small incisions using traditional and standard liposuction techniques. This is very appealing to patients, and it essentially yields no donor side morbidity. And in fact, to many potential donors, it is a highly attractive prospect to donate their adipose tissue. For these many reasons, adipose tissue is an extremely practical source of biological resources that may prove very useful in the emerging regenerative medicine field.
2:58
The process to isolate cells from adipose tissue has been well described in the '50s and '60s. It essentially consists of the steps listed here on slide six. First, the tissue is harvested, in our case usually by liposuction procedure. The tissue fragments then are washed and concentrated to get rid of any other fluids or blood components as best possible. The tissue is then subjected to an enzymatic dissociation, usually in the range of 30 to 60 minutes. And through various sequence of centrifugation and/or filtration steps, the free oil on in adipocytes, which are buoyant, will rise to the top after centrifugation. And the pelleted cells that will pulled to the bottom, known as the SVF, which stands for stromal vascular fraction. When these cells are plated onto tissue culture plastic, there is essentially a cell enrichment step, which is enrichment by adherence, and this yields ASCs.
4:03
To further clarify the difference of these cells, it's important for us to make sure we are on the same wave length when talking about SVF and ASCs. As mentioned, SVF stands for stromal vascular fraction. These are pelleted cells that result after the initial enzymatic digestion and centrifugation and or filtration steps. These cells have not been plated into plastic or any other surface. And these represent a mixed, or heterogeneous, population of cells that have been described decades ago. The SVF includes white blood cells, including macrophages, neutrophils, and lymphocytes, as well as endothelial cells and endothelial progenitor cells, pericytes and other perivascular type cells, stromal cells such as fibroblasts, and of course putative progenitor and stem cells.
Hide

Stem cells from adipose tissue

Embed in course/own notes