Evolution of diagnostic criteria for diabetes

Published on May 30, 2013   35 min

Other Talks in the Series: Diabetes in Perspective

0:00
This is Dr. Mayer B. Davidson. I am a Professor of Medicine at the Charles R. Drew University and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. And today I will be talking to you about the evolution of the diagnostic criteria for diabetes.
0:20
To make sure that we're on the same page, I first will give you a description of diabetes. It's a metabolic disorder, which is characterized by having elevated blood glucose, and you often hear the term blood sugar levels. Associated with this are small blood vessel complications. And these complications affect the eyes, and the kidneys, and the peripheral nerves. In addition, there are complications affecting the large blood vessels. And they cause heart attacks, strokes, and peripheral arterial disease-- That is the vessels that go into the legs often get clogged.
0:58
Usually, people with diabetes have no symptoms of it. The exceptions are that if the blood sugar is very high they will have increased urination and increased thirst, and maybe even some blurring of vision. Also, if they have the advanced complications that I mentioned on the previous slide, they will have the symptoms of those complications. But since most people don't have symptoms, the first and important step in diagnosing diabetes is to screen for it in people at high risk. Some examples of those individuals are those who are obese, those who have a positive family history in first degree relatives-- That is people whose parents have diabetes, whose brothers or sisters have diabetes, or children have diabetes-- this is in type 2 diabetes we're talking about here-- and those who have high blood pressure.
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Evolution of diagnostic criteria for diabetes

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