Evidence-based practices for children with autism spectrum disorder

Published on August 31, 2020   38 min

A selection of talks on Clinical Practice

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My name is Brian Reichow. I'm an Associate Professor at the Anita Zucker Center for Excellence in Early Childhood Studies at the University of Florida. Today I'll be presenting on "Evidence-Based Practices for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder".
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A brief overview of what we'll cover today. I'll provide a background and overview of the conceptualization of evidence-based practice. We'll then look at some comprehensive programs for children. I'll then describe four comprehensive treatment programs for children with autism, we'll then look at a few focal treatments for children with autism. I'll provide some conclusions and future directions and then provide additional resources and references.
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Initial conceptualization of evidence-based practice
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was in the field of medicine and was termed evidence-based medicine, but it really looked at the intersection of three different types of evidence and expertise. So looking at the best research evidence, clinical expertise, and patient values and choice, and evidence-based medicine really became the intersection of these three areas. According to the earliest conceptualizations,
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evidence-based medicine or practice wasn't necessarily just a designation of a treatment as being evidence-based. They really looked at it as being a process. The five steps of evidence-based practice were to formulate a focus question or what do you want to address with the treatment? Some type of systematic retrieval of the best empirical evidence. So what does the literature tell us. Once the literature is located, appraising the evidence and examining its validity, the relevance, applicability, and also looking at the magnitude of effects. Once you're able to appraise the evidence, decision on which treatment to use could be made, you'd begin using the treatment and continuing to evaluate performance to ensure that the desired results were found. If the desired results were occurring, you would continue to use that treatment, if the desired results were not found, that the child was not making the progress that was desired, you can go back into these steps and evaluate other treatments to determine if there was another treatment that might be a better choice. I think it's important to remember when thinking about evidence-based practice,
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Evidence-based practices for children with autism spectrum disorder

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