Statistical techniques in human population genetics

Published on April 19, 2016   52 min

Other Talks in the Series: Statistical Genetics

0:00
Welcome to the lecture on Statistical Techniques in Human Population Genetics, part of the statistical genetic series. I'm Garrett Hellenthal, a research fellow at University College London whose main work is in statistical and population genetics.
0:13
The main aims of this lecture are to describe the biological and demographic processes that contribute to genetic diversity, describe the statistical techniques that use observed DNA patterns to infer these past processes, illustrate the types of data used for inferring human history, and how we can learn different aspects of history using these different types of data, and finally, highlight some key findings about human history derived through the use of these techniques.
0:39
We'll start with some brief background. While overall DNA patterns among different human groups are very similar, nonetheless they are clear genetic differences among different human groups today. Several factors have contributed to this observed genetic diversity. For example, geographic isolation, groups being separated from each other due to physical boundaries, population size changes, and intermixing or admixture among genetically different groups. And underlying these factors are the usual genetic processes you will have learned about by now, that which we'll briefly review here, genetic drift, mutation, recombination, and selection. What the population geneticist is trying to do then is take the genetic differences that we observed and try to reverse this to learn about the past processes that have led to these differences.
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Statistical techniques in human population genetics

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