Legal aspects of using animals for research in the U.S.

Published on February 11, 2015   35 min

Other Talks in the Series: Animal Models in Biomedical Research

0:00
Good day everyone. My name is Taylor Bennett. And my presentation today is entitled The Legal Aspects of Using Animals for Research in the U.S. My presentation will attempt to put into perspective and explain the system of oversight of the use of animals in research, teaching, and testing in the US.
0:20
The eighth edition of the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals succinctly describes the oversight process in the US. It states at the use of laboratory animals is governed by an interrelated dynamic system regulations, policies, guidelines, and procedures. The regulations are those developed by the United States Department of Agriculture. The principal policy is the Public Health Service Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, that's the PHS policy, and the guidelines are those established by the Association for the Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International, AAALAC. Each institution then must establish procedures to manage their animal care and use program. The key players at the institutional level are the Institutional Official, or IO, the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee, or IACUC, the Attending Veterinarian, or AV.
1:17
The United States Department of Agriculture is the executive agency responsible for promulgating regulations to implement the Animal Welfare Act. The Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare, OLAW, within the Office of the Director of the NIH is responsible for implementation of the PHS policy, and requires that institutions receiving funds from the PHS adhere to the recommendations contained in the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. The Association for the Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International manages a voluntary, peer-reviewed accreditation process which uses the Guide as a primary resource for establishing requirements for accreditation.
2:00
In the Guide, the Animal Care and Use Program is defined as the activities conducted by and at an institution that have a direct impact on the well-being of animals, including animal and veterinary care, policies and procedures, personnel and program management, and oversight occupational health and safety, IACUC functions, and animal facility design and management.
2:24
The IO, or Institutional Official is the individual who has a representative of senior administration bears ultimate responsibility for the Program and is responsible for resource planning and ensuring alignment of Program goals with the institution's mission. The AV, or Attending Veterinarian is the veterinarian responsible for the health and well-being of all laboratory animals used at the institution.
2:51
The IACUC, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee is responsible for assessment and oversight of the institution's program components and facilities. The IACUC should have sufficient authority and resources to fulfill this responsibility. The IO, the AV, and the IACUC are also defined within the regulations, and thus have statutory authority and responsibility for the oversight of animal care and use.
3:16
I've used Chapter 2, Oversight of Research Animal Welfare in the United States from the publication Laboratory Animal Regulations and Recommendations for Global Collaborative Research, which I co-authored with John Bradfield, and Cynthia Gillett, as a basis for this presentation.
3:34
For an excellent review of the history of the Animal Welfare Act, which links to key documents, I referred you to the Animal Welfare Information Center link that appears on this slide. The regulations promulgated to implement the act can be found in the US Code of Regulations in Title 9, Chapter 1, Subchapter A, parts 1 and 4. The parts include the definitions which define the key terms used in the regulations and standards. The regulations which describe the institutional requirements for compliance, and the standards which deal with the daily care of the animals. The Rules of Practice describe certain enforcement practices.
4:16
The Laboratory Animal Welfare Act was originally acted in 1966. And the purpose was to ensure that animals intended for use in research facilities or for exhibition purposes or for use as pets are provided humane care and treatment, to ensure the humane treatment of animals during transportation and commerce, and to protect the owners of animals from theft of their animals by preventing the sale or use of animals which have been stolen. The act prohibits the promulgation of rules and regulations orders which would interfere with the conduct of actual research. Determination of what constitutes actual research was left to the discretion of actual research facility. The original act covered non-human primates, guinea pigs, hamsters, rabbits, dogs, and cats. The humane treatment was required while they were at the dealers or research facility and while being transported. Dealers were required to be licensed. Research facilities which used or intended use dogs or cats and either purchased them in commerce or received any federal funds were required to be registered. The secretary also established regulations and standards for the implementation of unannounced facility inspections, and for the maintenance of specific records by dealers and research institutions.
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Legal aspects of using animals for research in the U.S.

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