Biofilms and chronic wounds: winning the war in wounds

Published on October 7, 2014   46 min
0:00
Hello. My name is Gregory Schultz, and I'm a Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Director of the Institute for Wound Research at the University of Florida. This presentation will focus on the important topic of biofilms and chronic wounds, and especially how to win the war in wounds.
0:21
As an overview of topics, we're going to briefly review the four sequential phases of normal wound healing, because we want to specifically recognize the beneficial effects of controlled inflammation and protease activities. Because we want to understand there is a very strong link between chronic inflammation that is caused by both planktonic or single bacteria, as well as bacteria when they're in this biofilm community that we're going to talk about. Because these bacteria are extremely inflammatory, and they cause elevated levels of protease activities that destroy proteins that are essential for healing, such as the extracellular matrix proteins, growth factors, and their receptors. A key point about understanding the difference between bacteria growing as single planktonic and biofilm communities is that biofilm bacteria are highly tolerant to most antibiotics, antiseptics and disinfectants that are able to kill planktonic bacteria very rapidly. In addition, we want to try to integrate these ideas and concepts about the molecular biology of bacteria in biofilms into the integrated concept of biofilm based wound care. And the good news is that this is really just a slight different emphasis in the concept of wound bed preparation-- or the TIME acronym-- because it emphasizes the critical importance of debriding biofilms, and then especially preventing the bacteria in planktonic form from reforming the biofilm rapidly.
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Biofilms and chronic wounds: winning the war in wounds

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