RAS and RAF signaling in melanoma: biology and therapies

Published on November 30, 2010   37 min

Other Talks in the Series: Protein Phosphorylation

0:00
My name is Richard Marais, and I work at the Institute of Cancer Research. My laboratory is primarily interested in the problem of melanoma, and specifically in the role of RAS and RAF signalling in that disease. And today, I'm going to talk about our recent studies which are aimed at trying to understand the biology of melanoma, and then using that information to apply to therapeutic approaches.
0:24
Now, melanocytes are specialised pigment cells that are primarily found in the skin, but they're also found in the eyes, the ear, the brain and the heart. And in the skin their primary function is to control skin and hair tone, but also they're very important for protecting us from UV radiation, and this is the well known "tanning response". These cells are also the precursors of melanoma, and melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer, because although it only accounts for about 10 percent of all skin cancers, it causes about 80 percent of skin cancer deaths. There are about 62,000 cases of melanoma in Europe every year and this results in about 12,000 deaths. In America, there are about 50,000 cases of melanoma and a consequent 8,000 deaths. Now about 80 percent of melanomas are cured by surgery, and that is possible if the disease is caught early. However, about 20 percent of patients die from metastatic disease, and in those patients, the prognosis is very poor with a median survival of 6-9 months, and a five year survival of only 5-10 percent. The risk factors for melanoma are UV radiation and your underlying genetics. But it is quite clear that UV radiation is still required even if you have a poor genetic background.
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RAS and RAF signaling in melanoma: biology and therapies

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